BIOGRAPHY

Deborah Valoma is an artist, writer, professor, and chair of the Textiles Programs at California College of the Arts. Her interdisciplinary work considers textiles through multiple theoretical lenses including embodiment, materiality, ephemerality, and indigeneity. In addition to developing and teaching a comprehensive series of textile history and theory courses, Deborah has written articles and catalogue essays, presented papers, and curated exhibitions on related topics. She published the book Scrape the Willow Until It Sings that traces the indigenous philosophies and practices of Julia Parker, the premier Native American basket weaver in California. Deborah is currently working on a multi-year interdisciplinary project that began when she inventoried a collection of one hundred heirloom textiles inherited from her grandmother—most made by her foremothers in villages in Ottoman Turkey and the Armenian diaspora. A combination of research, archiving, and responsive making, The Armenian Postmemory Project addresses the role of textiles as signifiers of identity and agents of cultural continuity.

DOWNLOAD CV

Image Collections

Biography



BIOGRAPHY

Deborah Valoma is an artist, writer, professor, and chair of the Textiles Programs at California College of the Arts. Her interdisciplinary work considers textiles through multiple theoretical lenses including embodiment, materiality, ephemerality, and indigeneity. In addition to developing and teaching a comprehensive series of textile history and theory courses, Deborah has written articles and catalogue essays, presented papers, and curated exhibitions on related topics. She published the book Scrape the Willow Until It Sings that traces the indigenous philosophies and practices of Julia Parker, the premier Native American basket weaver in California. Deborah is currently working on a multi-year interdisciplinary project that began when she inventoried a collection of one hundred heirloom textiles inherited from her grandmother—most made by her foremothers in villages in Ottoman Turkey and the Armenian diaspora. A combination of research, archiving, and responsive making, The Armenian Postmemory Project addresses the role of textiles as signifiers of identity and agents of cultural continuity.

DOWNLOAD CV